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File: 1617110807170.jpg (705.58 KB, 1485x1977, √75-Awesome-Backyard-Lands….jpg)

 No.1308

Anyone into gardening?

I want to grow my own crops but I'm an absolute beginner with no experience.
The two things I would really like to start with are muscadine grapes and some form of tomatoes

I'm there a database or big book that just has information on different seeds and things like: time of year to plant, sunlight needed, tolerable temperature range, etc? Or any other good resource?

How about a database that has info on different regions and you input your area and it tells you what things grow best at what times of year?

Also what about designs for backyard gardens? Any redpilled designs?
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 No.1310

Just ask Smiley. Oh.. oh wait..

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 No.1311

>>1310
Heh i thought of AZG too when i saw this here thread

The gwiz nibber only posts on his fringe bort deez days

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 No.1313

File: 1617154519410.png (1.12 MB, 796x1029, jktyukyukyuk.png)

>>1308
I actually started getting into gardening a few weeks ago with the start of a new spring. So far I've only planted cactus. I have some big prickly pears some old lady sold me and I want to spread them all over the place. Also, there was a bunch of old wine bottles in my kitchen, I drilled holes in all of them and now they're gonna be used for small spice plants like jalapenos

Growing cactus feels like literal minecraft. They're incredibly tough, can grow in the sun, shade, rain, drought, whatever. Then you can also graft random cactus species onto each other

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 No.1314

File: 1617154667633.jpg (109.71 KB, 640x512, peyote_article4_003.jpg)

Look at this shit right here. Peyote grows incredibly slowly, so this dude here just grafted peyote buds onto an extremely fast growing weed-cactus called pereskiopsis, and now the peyote is growing to full size in a matter of months

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 No.1315

File: 1617156151634.jpg (337.54 KB, 1863x2037, jewmato.jpg)

>>1308
Tomatoes are easy, just go out and buy a wide variety of starts, plant them and then decide which plants you liked the best in terms of produce/productivity & save seeds from those plants for next year. Save all your eggshells and plant mix them in with the tomatoes' dirt, they're very calcium hungry plants, you can also get a spray on calcium solution that works pretty quick if it turns out your soil is calcium poor, if you're growing in containers & the roots run out of space then you'll be calcium poor.
I've never grown grapes, don't know too much about it, but those trellises they grow the grapes on work well with tomatoes too.
Once you figure out your favorite tomato varieties you can identify their deficiencies and start trying to improve them via inbreeding, keep at it for a few decades and you'll be growing the best tomatoes possible in your climate. at that point in time, never share your seeds, keep them all for yourself & live the rest of your life knowing you possess something so uniquely valuable that no amount of money can purchase it.

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 No.1321

File: 1617204865337.jpg (47.3 KB, 700x331, GAR_hardiness_zonesJAN-21.jpg)

So I'm doing research and I come across USDA plant hardiness zones. Is this firm "rule" to follow or more of a guideline? I'm technically zone 10a but right on the edge and only a few miles from being in zone 9b. What does this mean for me?

If I understand correctly, the zones represent the lower temperature limit a plant can tolerate. So since I'm zone 10a theoretically I can grow plants that can handle zones 10a and everything below right? But is there no upper temperature limit for plants? In my area summers are very hot and very humid and rainy, I feel like this would just kill some plants that grow well in colder climates

>>1315
sounds incredibly epic
Breeding sounds like a pretty advanced topic, tbh I don't even know how to properly raise them and provide proper care and nutrients yet. Do you have any books or other sources you would recommend?

>>1313
>>1314
based. blue agave grows like weeds in my area. Maybe I should start with that and make tequila out of it

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 No.1323

>>1321
I would imagine that logically there's an upper temperature limit for plants. I know potatoes for one always come from colder climates like Idaho and Wisconsin. In the south people never grow potatoes, they grow sweet potatoes which are similar in form and function but a completely different species of plant

I'd like to start growing sweet potatoes myself one day
http://fivegallonideas.com/growing-sweet-potatoes/

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 No.1334

>>1321
You don't need much of books to grow tomatoes, I already told you nearly everything you need to know in the previous post. They know how to grow on their own and don't need too much help, you learn more about whats going on by watching the plants & via trial & error than reading a book. If you're in a central florida/southern texas climate you can probably start getting your plants already. You might want to grow some marigolds near the tomatoes, theres something called cutworm that supposedly fucks with tomato plant stems and supposedly marigolds repel them, but I have never met cutworm in person so I don't know if its even real or some boogeyman that was invented to sell anti-cutworm solutions to rubes.
if you go get into hybridizing plants to make new varieties or inbreeding existing varieties to make them stronger, grapes are a good target species for that kind of fun, theres a lot of people out there working on new grape varieties and getting exciting results. not all plants are like that, apples and a lot of citrus require massive investments for a breeding operation, but grapes are something that can be worked on at a smaller scale.

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 No.1336

>>1321
Southwest desert area? I'd look up what the injuns in your area grew, given that they were agriculturalists

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 No.1346

File: 1617296960451.jpg (34.07 KB, 600x600, incredulous bob newhart.jpg)

>>1336
>learning from stone age savages
before they met the white man, native americans hadn't even mastered making fire yet, they hadn't invented the wheel either. in ten thousand years, with infinite resources available and thousands of miles of coastline, the best boat those savages had managed was a hollow rotten log that floats. they never even figured out how to keep livestock, the niggers in africa managed that trick. two was the biggest number they'd managed to think up in 10000 years, anything more than two was called "many". listerine americans are somewhere between australian aborigines and orangutans on the evolutionary ladder.

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 No.1347

Only indoor gardening, herbs, air purifying plants, warm weather bonsai and terrariums

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 No.1348

File: 1617300259460.jpg (232.27 KB, 900x675, external-content.duckduckg….jpg)

>>1346
I'd rank injuns above niggers definitely. Also they had llamas in the south

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 No.1349

File: 1617302839796.jpg (236.5 KB, 774x1032, inca.jpg)

>>1348
I agree with this sentiment, but I also recognize that central/south american civs and the north american tribes were in a completely different league

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 No.1350

File: 1617303269619.jpg (103.49 KB, 752x500, Mesaverde_cliffpalace_2003….jpg)

>>1349
They never made impressive monuments in North America, but they were still certainly above the level of niggers. They were probably all of very similar genetic stock, only limited by different environmental factors. Buffalo injuns are in huge flat fields without rocks or even trees

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 No.1356

whitecuck who watched too much talmudvision:
>muh native americans
>muh indians muffugguf
>muh noble savages
>*stares wistfully off at the horizon*
>*remembers wounded knee*
>*remembers the land-o-lakes slut*
>*does the tomahawk chop slowly & respectfully*

primitive listerino:
>pulls up to gas station
>"gimme two gallons"
>"sorry, you can't pay for gas with food stamps"
>"i can if i plan to drink it"
>*guzzles gasoline*
>*drinks the windex*
>drives off, crashes into a ditch
>"whitey did this!"
>"wheres muh welfare check?"

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 No.1357

File: 1617375401816.jpg (386.77 KB, 800x600, original.jpg)

>>1349
Woah they copied Aztec based

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 No.1361

Is ph levels a meme? Friends of mine that live just a few neighborhoods over have an awesome garden with a wide variety of plants like cucumbers and squash I don't think they bothered looking into that shit at all. Also, how do you preserve your veggie gains in states that have brutal winters?

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 No.1362

>>1356
Heh I'm a small part injun, maybe that's why I'm coping. In any case I'd rather be hunting buffalo and eating peyote than paying rent and taxes to kikes

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 No.1368

>preserve your veggie gains
Pickle stuff in mason jars, tomato sauces, blanch veggies in water and then bag them and freeze them. Cut and precook potatoes and bag those and have pounds of frozen french fries to cook in the oven later. Know a neighbor who takes the time to make fruit preserves and jellies, so every fall I give them a bunch of stuff I grow and then we share the preserves. It's warming up now and I'll be making a few gallons of dandelion wine in the weeks to come.
Gardening is good exercise, cheaper then grocery stores, and healthier eating. Hope that OP and other gardening anons have a good season.

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 No.1369

i think growing your own veges is a bit of a meme tbh
in season veges arent expensive, nor are frozen
what you can grow depends heavily on the climate and soil, otherwise you need to moderate as such with specialty soil and greenhouses, which costs time and money

where i live is heavy clay and mild temperate climate
locally grown things are pasture, apples, berryfruit, wine grapes, plums, some citrus and olives
these things grow well

one hot summer i grew tomatoes and chilies, they did well but i needed to buy loads of compost, fertilizer and was constantly watering the things
and then i had an abundance of produce to deal with
im still eating the dried chilli
a few years later and i tried again and the plants got some disease and performed poorly, a fucking waste of time

if you're planning on living in one place for a while then fruit/nut/citrus trees are good. they dont require as much maintenance compared to veges
as well as perennial herbs
but like i said all depends on the climate

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 No.1377

>>1369
>i think growing your own veges is a bit of a meme tbh
paying taxes so that you can earn incoming capital which comes in the form of rapidly devaluing fiatbux that you can then exchange for food, but only after you contribute to paying off the tax burden of everyone involved in producing food, is the meme.
the old "a penny saved = a penny earned" meme is only true in the case that the earned penny isn't taxed, but in irl the earned penny is taxed when it is earned and taxed again when its spent, so once taxation is added to that equation the value of a penny saved increases. the meme could easily be rewritten as something like "a penny saved = 0.5 pennies less for zog + 1 get a penny"

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 No.1384

File: 1617652118607.png (822.49 KB, 1546x3022, 331011366.png)

Waiting for my cactus cuttings to root and I'm starting to move my jalapeno plants into the bottles. The cactus people randomly mailed me two extra cuttings along with the one I ordered, so now I have 5 cuttings total from two different plants. When they grow up I'll be able to breed the two

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 No.1387

Got a cabbage plant I planted last year still growing, some kale and a couple indoor plants.

Tomatoes are really easy to grow. If you want to grow potatoes you can grow them in buckets to make it easier to get the potatoes out of the soil.

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 No.1388

>tfw no anti zog plantation

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 No.1389

File: 1617676055356.png (269.56 KB, 773x1511, 924952036.png)

I'm drinking a gin and tonic right now and thimking about my cactus

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 No.1390

>>1389
>Using trannerfox
Sad!

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 No.1393

>>1390
Firefox has a million extensions for security and privacy. It's also incredibly popular, so I'm lost in the crowd of other firefox users. When you browse with lithiumcat you're the only loser that uses that browser and the feds instantly know it's you

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 No.1394

File: 1617729031010.jpeg (934.6 KB, 1861x2048, Bosch.jpeg)

>>1308
>Books?
Taking a look at my shelf, here's what I have handy :
>Encyclopedia of Organic Gardening - J.I. Rodale
>Rodale's All-New Encyclopedia of Organic Gardening
>Square Foot Gardening - Mel Bartholomew
>Back to Eden - Jethro Kloss (mostly a health book, but covers some helpful things that overlap)
>Dry-Land Gardening - Jennifer Bennett
>The Reluctant Gardener - Shields and Von Baeyer (region specific to where I am, worth looking something for where you are)
Not a book, but handy dandy gardening cards
>Flora's Gardening Cards
Use the above more frequently than most of the books.

Trying and failing is better learning than most books though as I'm sure others have observed itt. I currently work for a fairly large green house/organic farm operation (three green houses with two of them being in use year-round) so I'm constantly having a variety of curveballs lobbed at my dumb noggin until small skull fragments of learnage peenertrait muh brains.

If you know prolific gardeners in your area, even retiree backyard ones, it's worth approaching them as most will happy to talk your ear off and often have their own heirloom seeds on hand to start you off. These are an amazing resource as plants grown in specific areas/soils will slowly adapt to grow better suited to said area and pass on those traits genetically through their seed line insuring better yields and heartier plants.

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 No.1395

>>1393
> I'm lost in the crowd of other firefox users
you aren't, the collection of data you transmit via your web browser is entirely unique, that type of data has been used as a tracking tool for a long time already, if you're concerned about being anonymous on the internet and you're ignoring the uniqueness of the data you're uploading then you've got your head buried in the sand. comfortably dumb

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 No.1416

File: 1617998554485.png (949.94 KB, 1546x3022, 474773390.png)

A couple of days ago I delivered a pizza to a house with a huge loquat tree out front. I asked the guy if I could pick some and he was fine with it. Then his wife came outside with a bag for me and seemed really happy someone asked about her tree, but I turned down her bag because I only picked three

Later on I ate them and they were absolutely delicious, like extra sweet peaches. If I had known this at the time I would have picked a lot more of them

Now I'm trying to grow the seeds outside in an egg carton I poked holes in, along with other wild and store bought fruit seeds

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 No.1420

>>1416
pretty based ngl

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 No.1435

File: 1618103263894.jpg (585.78 KB, 600x2600, 1617844346672.jpg)


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 No.1457

I've been watching this based boomer teach me how to grow taters. Gonna try it soon with my own tub

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 No.1467

File: 1618266341573.jpg (1.27 MB, 1000x1000, Amaranthe_Golden.jpg)

Just ordered some giant orange amaranth seeds off amazon. They're a form of wheat that requires almost no work to harvest and process, and they usually grow like weeds

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 No.1498

This thread hypes me up to do some gardening. After I move in a couple weeks ima plant some potatoes or something.

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 No.1499

>>1498
Potatoes seem like the GOAT vegetable. You can grow them in dirt, old straw, sawdust, almost anything, and every single little eye on the potato becomes a new potato

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 No.1500

File: 1618446348056.png (478.82 KB, 800x1131, 1605335577269.png)

>>1499
Yeah, that was my thought as well. Potatoes are the only thing I've ever grown really successfully, and according to the soil survey conducted on the new property I'm moving to it should be good for them.

I'd also love to try planting horseradish, fresh herbs, and rye for the chickens.

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 No.1501

>>1467
Do you eat that weird looking part heh

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 No.1502

I wonder what vegetables you could plant just about anywhere and expect them to grow unattended. I'm worried that they will try and starve us so maybe I'll go around planting gourds or some shit like Johnny Appleseed and make my city more resistant to these tactics heh

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 No.1503

File: 1618464088639.png (103.53 KB, 619x693, Untitled.png)

>>1501
I believe the green parts are edible when boiled (maybe raw also) and the orange part grows edible seeds. So you just need to shake or thresh the orange part and then you have seeds for making bread with or doing whatever

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 No.1509

File: 1618494962202.jpg (544.27 KB, 2656x1494, 623c80590e809f1fc916351d42….jpg)

>>1502
Things like berries, some heartier fruit trees, wild garlic, onions (green and otherwise) and kale can all be sown fairly easily. Potatoes and tubers are good too because they can become prolific underground without too many people noticing unless they know the spots where they were planted. Certain types of downed logs can also be soaked and covered in spores then left in the woods to produce different types of mushrooms, but you have to stay on top of the fixed periods of time they'll even be available for harvest (sometimes it's just a week and will be dependent on recent rainfall/moisture).

There's also the option of learning what plants game animals are partial to in your area so that they'll be more prone to breed in larger numbers/fatten themselves and give you somewhat of a heads up as to where those types of animals will congregate for trapping purposes.

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 No.1521

File: 1618603336491.png (442.88 KB, 773x1511, 2589155609.png)

Just finished sowing the amaranth seeds. We'll see if these seeds from amazon grow at all

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 No.1544

Harvested six prickly pear cuttings from the beach today. Gonna grow these things all over the place. The fruit is delicious

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 No.1545

File: 1618890610225.png (230.58 KB, 912x1783, 2143471181.png)


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 No.1627

File: 1619579121873.png (507.64 KB, 1546x3022, 514765457.png)

Harvested 22 more prickly pear pads from the wild today, bring me to a total of 28. Soon they'll all be planted and growing huge

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 No.1629

>>1627
Got to be careful with cacti, they're invasive-but could be useful as a low-maintenance food source. Having cactus and bamboo around as well would probably be a good way to ensure you always have access to free food and free, fast growing light building material, just try and be conscientious towards the local ecosystem heh

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 No.1654

>>1629
>35 mins
cant watch that whole thing right now, what's he growing that bamboo for?

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 No.1663

>>1654
That was actually the wrong video and I'm not sure what the other one was suppose to be, my bad. Nonetheless there's tons of youtube videos featuring people from Florida gowing bamboo. It's (rightly) seen as a sustainable alternative to other woods so it has a future as a cash crop or simply something you could use to eat or make basic shit out of.



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